Posts Tagged ‘401K’

When Plan Participants Leave Your Company

Tuesday, December 11th, 2018

FMI: When Plan Participants Leave Your Company

What happens when plan participants leave your company?

There is a provision in the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act passed December 22, 2017, that affects plan participants who terminate employment with an outstanding loan. Before passage of the law, the loan would have been due immediately.

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Accelerated Retirement Is Possible If You Follow The Right Roadmap

Friday, December 7th, 2018

FMI - Retirement Planning

Everybody imagines retiring early, but few people manage to do it. A recent Willis Towers Watson survey reported that far more working Americans are planning to retire after age 65 (46%) than before it (30%).1 Here are five steps you can take to jumpstart the process.

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2017: A Good Year For Participants

Tuesday, December 4th, 2018

FMI 2017: A Good Year for Participants

Auto Features Contributing to Participation, Average Balance Increases

It was a good year for individual account plans, including 401(k)s and 457s. In fact, 2017 may go in the record books as the first year the number of plans with an average auto-enrollment deferral rate of 6% exceeded the number of plans with a default deferral rate of 3%, as it has commonly been.

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Open Enrollment Season

Tuesday, November 13th, 2018

FMI Open Enrollment November

This is a quarterly reminder to take advantage of Open Enrollment at your company, which usually happens in November. This is a good time to make sure you are maximizing your retirement account contributions, adjusting tax withholdings for the upcoming years, and checking your overall benefits such as life insurance, health savings accounts (HSAs) or flexible spending accounts (FSAs).

Hey, your 401(k) is not a piggy bank.

Saturday, June 7th, 2014

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With a piggy bank, you put money in and take it out. It’s a fairly simple tool, and it’s great for what it’s used for. A 401(k), on the other hand, is a great tool to save for retirement. But increasingly, they are being used as something they aren’t: piggy banks.

Recent studies show that Americans are increasingly pilfering from their 401(k) accounts. With the economy being the way it has been since the financial crisis, that’s understandable on one level, but the choice can put your retirement plans on a slippery slope.

According to the IRS, a whopping $57 billion was withdrawn prematurely from 401(k) accounts in 2011, up 37 percent in inflation-adjusted dollars from 2003. You could argue that if a person needed the money to survive, then an early withdrawal from a 401(k), even with the tax penalty, is better than most other options – to a point.

Unfortunately, younger individuals are withdrawing the most. According to a recent study, nearly 40 percent of workers between 20 and 39 cash out their plans when they change jobs.

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Being financially savvy with your 401(k) can earn you more.

Tuesday, May 27th, 2014

If ever you needed an incentive to learn more about money, this might be it. A new study shows that the more financially savvy you are, the more you’ll earn on your 401(k) plan. And not just a little bit more, a whole lot more–up to 1.3 percentage points more per year on your retirement plan investments than your less sophisticated counterparts.

In fact, being financially literate could help you build over the course of a 30-year working career a retirement fund some 25% larger than that of less-knowledgeable peers, according to the study, “Financial Knowledge and 401(k) Investment Performance,” which was recently published as a working paper on the National Bureau of Economic Research website.

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Your 401(k) can start to blossom this spring with these handy tips

Monday, May 5th, 2014

Unless you scour the voluminous info about your plan (which you should, but probably don’t) you might miss some important tips that can make a real difference in your planning down the road.  Here are seven things to bear in mind when reviewing your porfolio.

1. You can rollover.  When you leave your employer, you can transfer your 401(k) plan to an individual retirement account – and it is not a taxable event. This type of transfer is called a rollover. Many 401(k) participants think that any type of distribution from their 401(k) plan is taxable and subject to penalties. That isn’t true.

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Happy retirement: Stop worrying about paying taxes.

Monday, April 28th, 2014

When you contribute to a Roth IRA you typically don’t have to worry about paying taxes on that money or its investment gains ever again. And employers are increasingly adding a Roth option to their 401(k) plans. Aon surveyed 400 employers covering 10 million employees in 2013 and found that half now offer a Roth 401(k) plan. Here are some of the benefits
of saving for retirement in a Roth account:

Having a tax-free account in addition to your pre-tax savings gives you more options to reduce taxes in retirement.
Tax complications don’t end when you leave the workforce. In fact, your taxes in retirement can actually be more complicated than in the years when you were working. For the most part, you’ll want to withdraw money you have in taxable and Roth accounts first and delay paying taxes on your savings in traditional retirement accounts as long as possible. But it’s also possible that you could pay significantly higher taxes if you delay too long and your traditional retirement account gets big enough for required minimum distributions to force you into a higher tax bracket. With money in different pots, you’ll have a chance to run different scenarios and maximize your after-tax retirement income.

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Key questions (and answers) for Plan Sponsors

Monday, April 7th, 2014

Q: Is there a relationship between automatic enrollment and employer decisions about matching contributions and total compensation?

A: Recent research by the Center for Retirement Research at Boston College (CRR) found that auto-enrollment is related to relatively low employer match rates and default rates, but not overall compensation. The How Does 401(k) Auto-Enrollment Relate to the Employer Match and Total Compensation? report indicates that auto-enrollment plans had a matching rate of about 0.4 percentage points less than plans without auto-enrollment, even taking into account other factors.

The researchers also investigated whether low-default contribution rates adopted by employers who have auto-enrollment in their plans. It appears that employers who have this feature may be using a relatively low default rate, with resulting lower matching, to offset the higher costs that occur from higher participation rates found in auto-enrollment plans. 
The study concluded that auto-enrollment increases saving for workers who would not have participated in the plan without that provision. However, employees who would have participated in the absence of auto-enrollment may, over time, save less because of relatively low employer match rates.

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Employers: How does your plan compare?

Sunday, March 23rd, 2014

The good news is that the Participant Deferral Rate rose slightly year on year.

The average participation rate in 401(k) plans was 88% at the end of 2012, according to the 56th Annual Survey of Profit Sharing and 401(k) Plans by the Plan Sponsor Council of America (PSCA). The rate is defined as the average percentage of eligible employees who had a balance in the plan, as the average number of investment choices offered to participants remained at 19 across all employer plans.

The year before the rate was 86%. An average of nearly 81% of eligible employees made contributions to the plan in 2012. The average participant pre-tax deferral rate was 6.8%, compared to 6.4% the year before.  Here are some highlights:

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